THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF THIRTY-SIX

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Chapter Two

Aiyeka

The woman saw that the tree was good to eat and attractive to the eyes, and [she] desired it to understand and ate and gave to her husband with her, and [he] ate. The eyes of the two of them were opened, and they knew they were naked ... Bereishis 3:6-9

They knew they were naked ... Even a blind person knows when he is naked; rather ... they had one mitzvah and were ‘stripped’ of it (Bereishis Rabbah 19:6) - Rashi.

... and they sewed fig leaves and made a belt for themselves. They heard the voice of God coming in the garden in the breeze of the day, and the man and his wife hid from before God in the trees of the garden. God called the man and said to him, ‘Aiyeka?’ (Where are you?)

Rebi Shimon ben Pazi said: The word aiyeka is only used as a gematria equaling thirty-six .. . Midrash Zuta, Eichah 1:1

("Why was Israel smitten with ‘Aicah’? Because they transgressed the thirty-six krisos (transgressions punishable by excision from the Jewish people) of the Torah." (Sanhedrin 104a) This again shows the correlation between ‘Aicah’ and the number thirty-six.)

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The Torah called the original light of creation "good," implying that it was an accurate fulfillment of the Divine intention when creating the world. Adam’s violation of the commandment to not eat from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil was just the opposite, and as such, an abrogation of the very concept embodied by the supernal light.

Aiyeka - where are you? - also means "Thirty-six!" as if to say, "How have you acted in a way that reveals the Hidden Light that shone for thirty-six hours, and which embodies all that thirty-six stands for?" Thus, as much as the original light of creation was hidden within the first week of creation, it is still possible to reveal it through our actions, or, conversely, keep it hidden.

© by Mercava Productions

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